Healthy Recipes - CKD and Diabetic

When you have chronic kidney disease, CKD, diet is an important part of your treatment plan. Your recommended diet may change over time if your kidney disease gets worse. Not everyone has the same restrictions and everyone’s diet is individualized. Nutrients affecting the kidneys Include proteins, sodium, potassium and phosphorus.

Protein

Protein helps build muscles & repair tissues, fights infections and prevents waste from building up in your blood. Proteins comes from red meats, poultry (chicken, turkey, duck), fish and other seafood, eggs, milk, cheeses, tofu, legumes (fruits or seeds of plants that are grown in pods, like peas) and beans. Large protein portions may increase the workload of the kidney so keep portion sizes to 3 ounces per serving.

Remember:

High quality proteins comes from animal products like meat, poultry, fish, eggs and dairy products. These are the easiest proteins for your body to use. Low quality proteins comes from vegetables and grains. A well balanced diet should include both kinds of proteins every day

Sodium

Sodium, salt, in very small quantities, can help reduce fluid buildup in the body and helps to control blood pressure within normal ranges. Sodium is found in most foods, but is especially high in table salt & sea salt, salty seasonings (e.g. soy sauce, teriyaki sauce,garlic salt, and seasoning salt), most canned foods, some frozen foods, processed meats (e.g. ham, bacon, sausage, cold cuts), salted snack foods (e.g. chips, crackers, pickles), most restaurant and take-out foods and canned or dehydrated soups (e.g. packaged noodle soup).

Suggestions:

  • Eat foods closest to their natural state (unprocessed)

  • Read food labels for sodium content.

  • Use fresh or dried herbs and spices instead of table salt

  • Try a dash of hot pepper sauce

  • Vinegar or lemon juice, oil and spices can be used to marinate meats

  • Try no-added salt blends

  • Avoid salt substitutes

Potassium

Potassium is an important mineral that helps your muscles & heart work well. Too much or too little potassium in the blood can be dangerous. Not everyone needs the same amount of potassium and how much you need will depends on how well the kidneys are working, if you are taking medications that can change the level. Potassium is found in all foods but large amounts are found in certain fruits & vegetables (bananas, melons, oranges, potatoes, tomatoes, dried fruits, dark green leafy vegetables & some fruit & vegetable juices), milk and yogurt, dried beans and peas, salt substitutes, chocolate, nuts and seeds, lentils and legumes (fruits or seeds of plants that are grown in pods, like peas).

QuickTips:

  • Know your blood potassium level (normal 3.5-5.0).

  • If it is too low you may need a supplement to raise the level

  • If it is too high you will need to avoid high potassium foods

  • If it is too high you may need a binder to lower the level

  • Soaking or double-boiling root vegetables will reduce the amount of potassium in the vegetables



Low Potassium Recipes

Phosphorus

Phosphorus is a mineral that works together with calcium to form strong bones & teeth.In kidney disease, phosphorus starts to build up in your blood and Calcium and is pulled from the bone into the blood causing serious problems like damage to the heart & other organs, poor blood circulation, bone pain & bone weakness and skin ulcers. Phosphorus is found in most foods. Large amounts are found in dairy products (milk, cheese, pudding, yogurt, ice cream), dried beans and peas (kidney beans, split peas, lentils), nuts and seeds, other beverages (colas, beer, cocoa) chocolate, whole grains especially bran, seasoned meats & processed/convenience foods and baking powder.

Suggestion:

use non-dairy creamers and recommended milk substitutes in place of milk to help lower the amount of phosphorus in your diet.

Low Phosphorus Recipes

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